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Poster: StanO Date: Jun 21, 2006 11:25am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

Speed does play a small part in the process as the burner burns the Pits and Lands (the data grooves of the cd) are affected by how fast you burn. It has more to do with how clean the pit and land are burnt than how deep it is etched.

There is no affect on longevity, if you use crappy CD media then their longevity will be shorter, use high quality media and it can last more than a lifetime.

The slower you burn, (Quality of media and Quality of burner Not withstanding) the better off you are for sound reproduction. Anything over 24 speed the drive has to adjust angular velocity to achieve with higher burn speeds. As long as you are using good media, 24x and below you should produce great quality in the CDDA format.

HTH,

stano

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Poster: Wayne Kempton Date: Jun 21, 2006 12:44pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

I use Memorex Music CD-R's that are rated for 40X. Should I be buying CD's rated below 24X or can I burn at say 24X or less (8X) on these 40X rated cd's? What do you think are THE BEST cd's to use for burning concert flac files?
Thanks for your last reply.

Wayne

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffTyler Date: Jun 21, 2006 3:50pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

Those disks are great. just burn them slower (24x) and you will be fine.

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Poster: xtifr Date: Jun 21, 2006 4:29pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

> There is no affect on longevity

Not true. The speed affects the precision with which the bits are written to the disk, and less-precisely-placed bits become unreadable with less degradation. The photosensitive dyes in the CD tend to degrade over time, so the writing speed does have some effect on the longevity.

> The slower you burn, (Quality of media and Quality of burner Not withstanding) the better off you are for sound reproduction.

Also not true. Very MUCH not true! First of all, this is a digital medium, so the only question for sound reproduction is: can the bits be read or not. If there is any change in sound quality between two discs, it means that one of those discs is partially unreadable. No matter what speed they were written at. This is the fundamental difference between analog media (like tape) and digital media.

And second (and much more important), modern drives are optimized to write best at their top speed. At speeds below that, the placement of the bits is less certain, and thus sound degradation (from unreadable bits) and lowered longevity are more likely. At very slow speeds, the drive may become more precise again, but intermediate speeds tend to be the most unreliable.

I once believed this myth myself, but then I discovered that my drive produces coasters fairly regularly at 16x or 24x, but works nearly-flawlessly at 8x or 56x. So much for "24x is best!" :)

edit: in fact, most independent scientific studies that have been done show little or no effect from burn speed with most drives. But the fact remains that manufacturers only do QA on their drives at top speed, and anything else is more-or-less a crap-shoot.

This post was modified by xtifr on 2006-06-21 23:29:55

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Poster: cousinkix1953 Date: Jun 21, 2006 5:07pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

I buy my blank TDK slimpacks by the bricks at a famous club store. They are rated at 52X and the Plextor CD burner at 48X maximum. Common sense tells me that the fastest speeds compromise quality, as was the case with dubbing cassette tapes.

Burning the shows at a slower 16X takes about 5 minutes per disk. No problems yet. Are you really in a bigger hurry?

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Poster: xtifr Date: Jun 21, 2006 6:34pm
Forum: etree Subject: Re: CD Burn Speeds

"Common sense" is wrong in this case. Digital data (like on CDs) is fundamentally different from analog data (like on cassettes). Analog copies are inherently imperfect; each copy varies slightly from its original. Digital copies are either perfect or failed. There is no in-between.

Bottom line, yes, use whatever works for you. But if you're sticking with lower speeds because you're afraid that higher speeds won't work as well, you're simply wasting your own time. Only minutes, yes, but they're still being wasted. And, in fact, the truth is very much the opposite--errors are more common at lower speeds, because the drives aren't tested and aligned to work properly at those lower speeds. If you're getting anything but 100% results at a lower speed, I strongly suggest switching to full speed and see for yourself if things don't improve. Otherwise, yeah, do whatever you want. :)

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